MODULE # 13 MANAGING YOUR LIFESTYLE

GRAPHIC (SLIDE): MANAGING your lifestyle

Super: John Parker, 34
Diagnosed: 2004

NARRATOR (5s): After John was first diagnosed with diabetes he did little to adjust his lifestyle. He continued to smoke and drink.

JOHN PARKER (10s): When you drink, it drops your sugar level, right and at times I would wake up the next day and feel a little sluggish, whatnot… I guess it would affect it, because actually it was taking a toll on your body.

FACTS AND RISK FACTORS

NARRATOR (5s): Smoking and drinking are both lifestyle choices that affect your health, especially if you have diabetes.

Super: Dr. Ian Blumer, Diabetes Specialist

IAN BLUMER (14s): Smoking is, with glucose, a combined toxin on the circulation. People who have diabetes and smoke are that much more likely to die early. And even if they don't die early, they are more likely to have complications and it reduces the quality of their life.

NARRATOR (15s): Limited consumption of alcohol is typically not hazardous for people living with diabetes, but alcohol - especially if you take insulin therapy - can lead to low blood glucose. Low blood glucose causes symptoms such as heart palpitations, sweatiness, dizziness and can even make you pass out.

GRAPHIC:
SYMPTOMS:
- heart palpitations
- sweating
- dizziness
- loss of consciousness

GRAPHIC: TIPS

NARRATOR (5s): These complications can be avoided if you learn to manage your lifestyle. You can begin by following these tips.

TEXT: 1) stop smoking

NARRATOR (2s): Number 1. Stop Smoking!

NARRATOR (6s): Smoking is a health hazard to all of us but if you have diabetes, it is critical that you quit smoking.

IAN BLUMER (6s): I never tell anybody with diabetes that anything in life is forbidden, except for smoking, if people smoke they've gotta do their darndest to try to quit.

IAN BLUMER (9s): It may not work the first time or the second time or the tenth time. But virtually everybody who smokes, if given the right tools, with enough effort, can succeed in quitting.

TEXT: 2) speak to your family health care provider about alcohol

NARRATOR (3s): Number 2. Speak to your family health care provider about alcohol.

NARRATOR (4s): If you drink alcohol, let your family health care provider know and ask how much is safe for you to consume.

TEXT: 3) remember to eat

NARRATOR (3s): Number 3. Remember to eat some food when you drink.

NARRATOR (4s): This will lessen the risks associated with low blood glucose levels.

IAN BLUMER (7s): If you take alcohol, especially without food, especially in the late evening, it can actually cause problems with low blood glucose overnight.

GRAPHIC: BENEFITS

NARRATOR (4s): If you learn to manage your lifestyle you can avoid many of the serious complications of diabetes.

IAN BLUMER (6s): People who quit smoking, often they come in and they tell me - you know, I didn't realize I was feeling crummy before.

JOHN PARKER (5s): I feel totally healthy - I stopped smoking and drinking, I feel a lot better. I just feel totally, totally different.

NARRATOR (00:07): For more information check your fact sheet - Alcohol and Diabetes.

NARRATOR (00:06): You can also get additional information from your family health care provider.

NARRATOR (00:06): And by calling Smokers' Helpline at 1-877-513-5333.


GRAPHICS (End slide): FOR MORE INFORMATION
CHECK YOUR FACT SHEET ALCOHOL AND DIABETES

GRAPHICS (End slide): YOU CAN ALSO GET
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM YOUR
FAMILY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

GRAPHICS (End slide): YOU CAN ALSO CALL
SMOKERS' HELPLINE AT 1-877-513-5333

END CREDITS (Slide): SPECIAL THANKS
John Parker
Canadian Diabetes Association

END CREDITS (Slide): SENIOR MEDICAL CONSULTANT
Dr. Ian Blumer
Chair, Dissemination and Implementation Committee
CDA 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines

www.ourdiabetes.com

END CREDITS (Slide): PRODUCED BY
The Government of Ontario

END CREDITS (Slide): Queen's Printer for Ontario 2009

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