Banding the Threatened Peregrine Falcon

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Banding the Threatened Peregrine Falcon



(Mark Nash - Director, Canadian Peregrine Foundation)
Another historic day for some species-at-risk - the Peregrine Falcons that were produced here at the Toronto Sheraton Hotel on the south nest ledge, just under the "S".

(Mark Heaton - Biologist, Ministry of Natural Resources)
Today, we're banding Peregrine Falcon chicks. We've got approximately ten breeding pairs within the Greater Toronto Area. They are about 28 days old, and we've got four of them.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service band. It's a serial number, just like on your car


(Mark Nash - Director, Canadian Peregrine Foundation)
Banding is important on a number of fronts. These silver and black aluminium bands that are placed on these young birds' legs will ultimately protect these birds outside this county. It says a very clear message that this is a bird, a species from another county in recovery. That bird, should it be caught on migration in the fall or spring, is to be re-released, back to the wild.


(John Pisapio - Biologist, Ministry of Natural Resources)
She stands her ground, being a good mama. Some of them are more aggressive than others and actually make contact with you and hit you in the head. It can be stressful t times.

(Mark Nash - Director, Canadian Peregrine Foundation)
Peregrine Falcons - they are still experiencing some fairly difficult challenges - past, present and in the future.

(Unidentified voice)
Time to go back home!

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