MODULE # 4 MODIFICATION OF SOUTH ASIAN DIET

GRAPHIC (Slide): THIS VIDEO IS TO HELP YOU
MODIFY THE TYPICAL
SOUTH ASIAN DIET

GRAPHIC (Slide): WE RECOMMEND YOU ALSO WATCH MANAGING YOUR NUTIRITION

NARRATOR (00:12): This video is to help you modify some of the food and cooking methods in the typical South Asian diet. In order to get a clear idea about portion control and food choices, we recommend you also watch Managing Your Nutrition.

GRAPHIC: MANAGING your south asian diet

RAJ SUNDER (00:05): Living with diabetes and having the complications can be extremely terrifying.

SUPER: RAJ SUNDER, 55
DIAGNOSED: 2001

ANANBA VISVANATHAN 73
DIAGNOSED: 1991

NARRATOR (00:07): Raj's mother, Ananba, also has diabetes. This has proved challenging for his wife Chitra, who is caring for both of them.
SUPER: Chitra Sunder

CHITRA SUNDER (00:04): There has been a lot of changes that I had to go through and dealing with the frustrations.
NARRATOR (00:05): Frustrations mainly centred on food and how to modify their traditional South Asian diet.
CHITRA SUNDER (00:11): You need to really think of innovative things to cook on a daily basis so that you have increased portions of items on the menu, that do not affect the diabetes.

GRAPHIC: FACTS & RISK FACTORS:

NARRATOR (00:06): South Asians are at an especially high risk for diabetes. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications.

SUPER: Fatima Punjani, Registered Dietitian
FATIMA PUNJANI (00:16): It could damage your eyes and your kidneys, it could damage your nerves, so the sensation ability of your hands and feet. And many other complications of the heart, so it could cause heart attacks, it could cause strokes, so it has a lot of damaging complications.

GRAPHIC: TIPS
NARRATOR (00:06): South Asian food uses a lot of carbohydrates which cause high blood glucose levels. Here's how to make your diet healthier.
TEXT AND NARRATOR: 1) cut down on your carbohydrates
NARRATOR (00:04): Number 1. Cut down on your carbohydrates like rice or rotis.
NARRATOR (00:07): Half of your plate should be vegetables, a quarter should be protein, and the other quarter starches. That's about one-third of a cup of cooked rice.
FATIMA PUNJANI (00:08): If you tell a South Asian that he or she is allowed to eat just one third cup of rice, they'll probably laugh at you and say, I eat four times or six times that much.
TEXT AND NARRATOR: 2) get creative with your cooking
NARRATOR (00:07): Number 2. Get creative with your cooking. The Sunders eat traditional South Indian vegetarian food.
CHITRA SUNDER: This is the maximum quantity of rice that my husband can eat for one meal.
CHITRA SUNDER (00:21): So, I have to be creative over here and try to find alternatives so that he gets filled up. So, this is I have green beans over here, I have cooked spinach over here, and I have brussel sprouts. That's what I cooked today.
NARRATOR (00:04): Chitra uses lentils for protein, adding them to these rice cakes called idli.
TEXT AND NARRATOR: 3) fry less, bake more

NARRATOR (00:03): Number 3. Fry less, bake more.
NARRATOR (00:04): Samosas and other fried snacks are very popular. Here's a healthier alternative.


FATIMA PUNJANI (00:09): You can bake the samosas, you can brush it with a little bit of oil. They don't look as appetizing probably, but they're much healthier. They're just as crispy, just as tasty.
NARRATOR (00:03): Use canola or olive oil. It's better for your cholesterol.

TEXT AND NARRATOR: 4) make the healthy switch

NARRATOR (00:12): Number 4. Make the healthy switch to parboiled, converted, brown or wild rice. Try whole wheat flour rotis. Cut out fat by switching to 1% or skim milk and low-fat yogurt.
TEXT AND NARRATOR: 5) learn to read labels
NARRATOR (00:06): Number 5. Learn to read labels. That's where you will find important information about ingredients.
FATIMA PUNJANI (00:04): It takes a conscious effort to learn and understand how to read labels.
NARRATOR (00:03): Look for products with more fibre and less sugars.
TEXT AND NARRATOR: 6) watch your sweets

NARRATOR (00:06): Number 6. Watch your sweets. You do not have to give them up, just eat small amounts.

FATIMA PUNJANI (00:15): Fill up on your vegetables, so you're full at the end of the meal, and when you come to the dessert it's not a whole meal, it's just a small part, and then have fruit. That's your dessert, that's your sweet. But again, you still have to control the fruit, the amount of fruit that you have because fruit is also carbohydrate.
TEXT: BENEFITS
NARRATOR (00:04): Modifying your diet will lead to a happier and healthier life.
FATIMA PUNJANI (00:07): These changes are life long and if you are making these changes, you're preventing these complications, and making your quality of life better.

NARRATOR (00:07): For more information check your fact sheet - Healthy Eating: The Basics.

NARRATOR (00:05): You also get your food and nutrition questions answered by a registered dietitian

NARRATOR (00:03): It's free atů

NARRATOR (00:09): 1-877-510-510-2 or visit ontario.ca/eatright


GRAPHICS (End slide): FOR MORE INFORMATION
CHECK YOUR FACT SHEET
HEALTHY EATING: THE BASICS

GRAPHICS (End slide): YOU CAN ALSO GET
ALL YOUR FOOD AND NUTRITION QUESTIONS
ANSWERED BY A REGISTERED DIETITIAN

GRAPHICS (End slide): IT'S FREE

GRAPHICS (End slide): CALL 1-877-510-510-2
OR VISIT ontario.ca/eatright




END CREDITS (Slide): SPECIAL THANKS
Chitra Sunder
Raj Sunder
Ananba Visvanathan

END CREDITS (Slide): SPECIAL THANKS
Fatima Punjani, Registered Dietitian
Markham Stouffville Hospital
Canadian Diabetes Association

END CREDITS (Slide): SENIOR MEDICAL CONSULTANT
Dr. Ian Blumer
Chair, Dissemination and Implementation Committee
CDA 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines

www.ourdiabetes.com

END CREDITS (Slide): PRODUCED BY
The Government of Ontario


END CREDITS (Slide): Queen's Printer for Ontario 2009

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