MODULE # 7 MODIFICATION OF A MODERN FIRST NATIONS DIET

GRAPHICS (Slide): THIS VIDEO IS TO HELP YOU
MODIFY THE TYPICAL FIRST NATIONS DIET

GRAPHICS (Slide): WE RECOMMEND YOU ALSO WATCH
MANAGING YOUR NUTRITION

NARRATOR (00:11): This video is to help you modify your First Nations diet. In order to get a clear idea about portion control and food choices we recommend you also watch Managing your Nutrition.

GRAPHIC (SLIDE): Managing your first nations diet

NARRATOR (00:15): The modern First Nations diet tends to rely heavily on processed food that can be high in fat and sodium. This can lead to complications. Today, dietician Shawn Penny is working with Helen to help her make better food choices.

(B-roll, Shawn and Helen)

HELEN (00:02): Uh, what should I be looking for?

SHAWN PENNY (00:06): Well, Helen, I would focus on a variety, so you want to look for colourful fruits and vegetables and as you can see there's a lot of them available at this market.

SUPER: Shawn Penny
Registered Dietitian

GRAPHIC: WHEEL

SHAWN PENNY (00:20): One way you can think about better eating is by looking a balance and one of the ways we look at balance is through the medicine wheel. And take each colour of the medicine wheel and apply it to a food group. So for yellows, that's your grains, reds would be your fruits and vegetables, blacks would be your meats and white would be your calcium sources.

GRAPHIC: WHEEL - Red (top left corner)

NARRATOR (00:06): Starting with the red part of the medicine wheel, fruits and vegetables, here are some tips on modifying your First Nations diet.

GRAPHIC: 1) buy local and seasonal

NARRATOR (00:08): Tip number one. Buy local and seasonal. They're fresh and full of nutrients and if available in your area, often very economical.

(broll, SHAWN PENNY) (00:10): So if you want a specific example of something that's locally in season right now, let's take a look at this asparagus. As you can see, it's Ontario asparagus, it's nice and fresh. You can do a lot of different things with it.

NARRATOR (00:08): When you can't buy fresh, try canned or frozen fruits and vegetables. They're available year-round and they're just as nutritious.

GRAPHIC: WHEEL - Black (top left corner)

NARRATOR (00:04): Next, the black part of the medicine wheel. Meat and meat alternatives.

GRAPHIC: 2) buy leaner cuts

NARRATOR (00:03): Tip number 2 - buy leaner cuts.

SHAWN PENNY (00:06): So I would look at choosing things like chicken and fish more often. Beef and pork are still good but there are leaner cuts that you can use.

(b-roll, SHAWN PENNY) (00:22): If you look at the beef brisket for example, it's 3.19 a pound and you can see that's a nice lean cut of meat. There's very little fat on it and it's very inexpensive. Whereas you go to the rib eye steaks for example, you can see all that marbling in there, which is a lot of fat which means a lot of extra calories for you. Now, when you are picking leaner cuts of meat, you may have to cook them a little bit differently, but it's getting back to what the traditional ways of cooking are.

SHAWN PENNY (00:05): So looking at things like barbecuing, brazing, slow cooking as opposed to adding oil and frying the meat.

(b-roll, SHAWN PENNY) (00:06): And then if you have leftovers you can put that on a sandwich, as opposed to buying some of the lunch meats that have a lot of sodium in them.

(broll, S/UP, HELEN): Great.

GRAPHIC: WHEEL - White (top left corner)

NARRATOR (00:08): The white part of the medicine wheel represents milk and alternatives. Shawn recommends an interesting modification for First Nations clients.

GRAPHIC: 3) make some soup

NARRATOR (00:07): Number 3 - make some soup. Beyond dairy, soup can provide you with an alternative source of calcium.

SHAWN PENNY (00:11): In order to prevent osteoporosis you need good calcium sources. Using bones in things like soups and stews would give us calcium… for example, if we buy a turkey, we can use the turkey bones to make a soup a couple of days later.

NARRATOR (00:04): It's also a great option for many of those who are lactose intolerant.

GRAPHIC: WHEEL - Yellow (bottom right corner)

NARRATOR (00:04): The yellow part of the medicine wheel is grains, like rice and wheat.

GRAPHIC: 4) choose whole grains

NARRATOR (00:03): Number 4 - choose whole grains.

(b-roll, SHAWN PENNY) (00:12): So not so much the white choices but more these dark choices because they're going to have a lot of whole grain flours in them that are going to give you a lot of vitamins and nutrients and a lot of fiber. So there's lots and lots of great choices you can make in a bakery and I would encourage you to try some different things.

NARRATOR (00:05): And if you are baking or making bannock, mix in some whole wheat or whole grain ingredients.

TEXT: BENEFITS

SHAWN PENNY (00:08): So if we to go back to eating foods in a more traditional way, either by the foods we choose to eat or how we cook them, then we'd be a lot better off.

NARRATOR (00:10): Taking control of what you eat and knowing what's in your food is an important part in helping manage your diabetes. But don't forget to ask for help.

SHAWN PENNY (00:12):
There's a lot of support materials out there that have been provided by either your band or by the government to help deal with having diabetes and living with it on a day-to-day basis.

NARRATOR (00:06): For more information check your fact sheet - Healthy Eating: The Basics.

NARRATOR (00:06): You also get your food and nutrition questions answered by a registered dietitian

NARRATOR (00:03): For free at….

NARRATOR (00:07): 1-877-510-510-2 or visit ontario.ca/eatright


GRAPHICS (End slide): FOR MORE INFORMATION,
CHECK YOUR FACT SHEET
HEALTHY EATING: THE BASICS

GRAPHICS (End slide): YOU CAN ALSO GET
ALL YOUR FOOD AND NUTRITION QUESTIONS
ANSWERED BY A REGISTERED DIETITIAN

GRAPHICS (End slide): IT'S FREE

GRAPHICS (End slide): CALL 1-877-510-510-2
OR VISIT ontario.ca/eatright

END CREDITS (Slide): SPECIAL THANKS
Helen Parker
Shawn Penny, Registered Dietitian
Canadian Diabetes Association

END CREDITS (Slide): SENIOR MEDICAL CONSULTANT
Dr. Ian Blumer
Chair, Dissemination and Implementation Committee
CDA 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines

www.ourdiabetes.com

END CREDITS (Slide): PRODUCED BY
The Government of Ontario

END CREDITS (Slide): Queen's Printer for Ontario 2009

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